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Is an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Right for You?

button to apply an AED shock

An implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is a device that is surgically implanted into a patient’s chest. Your cardiologist might recommend an ICD if you are at risk for cardiac arrest. An ICD will monitor your heartbeat and provide electrical shocks if the heart rate rhythm is off. Talk to your heart doctor about whether an ICD is right for you.

How It Works

Your heart relies on electrical impulses to function properly. Each heartbeat is instigated by an electrical signal, and an irregular heartbeat means that your heart cannot pump blood as effectively. An ICD corrects this problem by monitoring your heart with electrodes. When it detects a problem, the ICD will correct it with electric signals created by its pulse generator. The device runs on batteries, which your heart doctor checks regularly to make sure the ICD is still working properly.

Who It Helps

Patients with an arrhythmia can greatly benefit from this life-saving device. Those who have had a heart attack or another heart problem tend to be at a higher risk of serious arrhythmia. If this applies to you, your cardiologist might recommend an ICD. Cardiologists also recommend ICDs for those with ventricular fibrillation.

What to Expect
Your cardiologist will likely recommend a series of diagnostic tests to determine if an ICD is right for you. A heart doctor evaluates the results of an electrocardiography (ECG) and an echocardiography, which are non-invasive tests. After having the surgery to implant the device, your cardiologist will test it and program it so that it is customized for your specific needs.

What to Consider
Talk to your cardiologist about recovery from the surgery. Long-term considerations include cell phone usage—it’s recommended that you place your cell phone no closer than six inches to the ICD. You should also stand at least two feet away from power generators. Additionally, ICD patients are advised to cease driving for six months following the surgery, as the electric signals can sometimes cause fainting.

If you have any other questions about how an ICD can benefit you, schedule an appointment with the cardiologists of Cardiac Solutions. Our clinics offers regularly scheduled checkups of your ICD device. Give us a call at (623) 876-8816 to learn more.An implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is a device that is surgically implanted into a patient’s chest. Your cardiologist might recommend an ICD if you are at risk for cardiac arrest. An ICD will monitor your heartbeat and provide electrical shocks if the heart rate rhythm is off. Talk to your heart doctor about whether an ICD is right for you.

How It Works
Your heart relies on electrical impulses to function properly. Each heartbeat is instigated by an electrical signal, and an irregular heartbeat means that your heart cannot pump blood as effectively. An ICD corrects this problem by monitoring your heart with electrodes. When it detects a problem, the ICD will correct it with electric signals created by its pulse generator. The device runs on batteries, which your heart doctor checks regularly to make sure the ICD is still working properly.

Who It Helps
Patients with an arrhythmia can greatly benefit from this life-saving device. Those who have had a heart attack or another heart problem tend to be at a higher risk of serious arrhythmia. If this applies to you, your cardiologist might recommend an ICD. Cardiologists also recommend ICDs for those with ventricular fibrillation.

What to Expect
Your cardiologist will likely recommend a series of diagnostic tests to determine if an ICD is right for you. A heart doctor evaluates the results of an electrocardiography (ECG) and an echocardiography, which are non-invasive tests. After having the surgery to implant the device, your cardiologist will test it and program it so that it is customized for your specific needs.

What to Consider
Talk to your cardiologist about recovery from the surgery. Long-term considerations include cell phone usage—it’s recommended that you place your cell phone no closer than six inches to the ICD. You should also stand at least two feet away from power generators. Additionally, ICD patients are advised to cease driving for six months following the surgery, as the electric signals can sometimes cause fainting.

If you have any other questions about how an ICD can benefit you, schedule an appointment with the cardiologists of Cardiac Solutions. Our Glendale, Peoria & Avondale clinic offer regularly scheduled checkups of your ICD device. Give us a call at (623) 876-8816 to learn more.

13128 N 94th Dr.
Peoria, AZ 85381

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Closed Sunday

8:00 AM to 4:30 PM Monday

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8:00 AM to 4:30 PM Wednesday

8:00 AM to 4:30 PM Thursday

8:00 AM to 4:30 PM Friday

Closed Saturday