• Take Care Of Your Heart With Help from Cardiac Solutions!

    Checking blood pressure

    Healthy eating and exercise are both great ways to get your heart in shape. Check out the wonderful links below for more information on everything from cardiomyopathy to implantable cardioverter defibrillators:

    • Read about implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute , including detailed information about how they work.
    • Medline Plus covers the basics of cardiomyopathy, a disease in which the heart muscle becomes enlarged and weakened.
    • The Mayo Clinic discusses the diagnostic tests and treatment options that a heart doctor may use for a patient with cardiomyopathy.
    • Learn about the various medications that can help manage high blood pressure with this guide from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
    • Health magazine has put together a slideshow of some top heart-healthy foods to add to your diet, including oatmeal and salmon.

    Want to know more about the medical services Cardiac Solutions has to offer? Give  Cardiac Solutions   a call today at (623) 876-8816.

  • Learn Even More About Your Heart And How Cardiac Solutions Can Help You Live A Healthy Life

    Stethoscope with reflection

    If you have a heart condition, it’s important to precisely follow your cardiologist’s instructions for treatment. You could also learn more about taking care of your heart with the following resources:

    • Many heart attack survivors subsequently suffer from depression. Learn more about caring for your emotional health with this link to the American Heart Association.
    • Everyday Health explores the link between depression and heart attack, and offers some helpful tips for coping.
    • Mended Hearts offers a list of coping techniques for heart attack survivors, along with a list of symptoms to watch out for.
    • A rapid heartbeat is called tachycardia. Find out about the typical symptoms and treatment options at CNN Health.
    • Get more information on tachycardia with this guide from the Mayo Clinic, including some possible complications and diagnostic tests.

    The caring cardiologists of Cardiac Solutions in Phoenix are dedicated to helping patients lead a heart-healthy lifestyle . Learn more about our team-based approach to patient care by calling (623) 876-8816. 

  • Keep Better Track of Your Heart Health with this Handy Logging App

    If you have a heart condition, your cardiologist will need to evaluate your blood pressure and cholesterol readings regularly. However, it can be tricky to keep track of all of this information—that’s where the HandyLogs Heart app comes in.

    This helpful app offers a wealth of features for tracking your health, including systolic, diastolic, and pulse trackers. The app allows you to keep multiple years of data for easy reference. You can also receive detailed analysis tools for your health information.

    iPhone 4 Apps

    To learn more about keeping better track of your heart health, schedule an appointment with the cardiologists of Cardiac Solutions. Whether you live in the Sun City West, Peoria or Glendale  area, give us a call at (623) 876-8816 to learn more about our diagnostic services and treatment plans.

     

     

  • Is an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Right for You?

    button to apply an AED shock

    An implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is a device that is surgically implanted into a patient’s chest. Your cardiologist might recommend an ICD if you are at risk for cardiac arrest. An ICD will monitor your heartbeat and provide electrical shocks if the heart rate rhythm is off. Talk to your heart doctor about whether an ICD is right for you.

    How It Works

    Your heart relies on electrical impulses to function properly. Each heartbeat is instigated by an electrical signal, and an irregular heartbeat means that your heart cannot pump blood as effectively. An ICD corrects this problem by monitoring your heart with electrodes. When it detects a problem, the ICD will correct it with electric signals created by its pulse generator. The device runs on batteries, which your heart doctor checks regularly to make sure the ICD is still working properly.

    Who It Helps

    Patients with an arrhythmia can greatly benefit from this life-saving device. Those who have had a heart attack or another heart problem tend to be at a higher risk of serious arrhythmia. If this applies to you, your cardiologist might recommend an ICD . Cardiologists also recommend ICDs for those with ventricular fibrillation.

    What to Expect
    Your cardiologist will likely recommend a series of diagnostic tests to determine if an ICD is right for you. A heart doctor evaluates the results of an electrocardiography (ECG) and an echocardiography, which are non-invasive tests. After having the surgery to implant the device, your cardiologist will test it and program it so that it is customized for your specific needs.

    What to Consider
    Talk to your cardiologist about recovery from the surgery. Long-term considerations include cell phone usage—it’s recommended that you place your cell phone no closer than six inches to the ICD. You should also stand at least two feet away from power generators. Additionally, ICD patients are advised to cease driving for six months following the surgery, as the electric signals can sometimes cause fainting.

    If you have any other questions about how an ICD can benefit you, schedule an appointment with the cardiologists of Cardiac Solutions. Our clinics offers regularly scheduled checkups of your ICD device. Give us a call at (623) 876-8816 to learn more.An implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is a device that is surgically implanted into a patient’s chest. Your cardiologist might recommend an ICD if you are at risk for cardiac arrest. An ICD will monitor your heartbeat and provide electrical shocks if the heart rate rhythm is off. Talk to your heart doctor about whether an ICD is right for you.

    How It Works
    Your heart relies on electrical impulses to function properly. Each heartbeat is instigated by an electrical signal, and an irregular heartbeat means that your heart cannot pump blood as effectively. An ICD corrects this problem by monitoring your heart with electrodes. When it detects a problem, the ICD will correct it with electric signals created by its pulse generator. The device runs on batteries, which your heart doctor checks regularly to make sure the ICD is still working properly.

    Who It Helps
    Patients with an arrhythmia can greatly benefit from this life-saving device. Those who have had a heart attack or another heart problem tend to be at a higher risk of serious arrhythmia. If this applies to you, your cardiologist might recommend an ICD . Cardiologists also recommend ICDs for those with ventricular fibrillation.

    What to Expect
    Your cardiologist will likely recommend a series of diagnostic tests to determine if an ICD is right for you. A heart doctor evaluates the results of an electrocardiography (ECG) and an echocardiography, which are non-invasive tests. After having the surgery to implant the device, your cardiologist will test it and program it so that it is customized for your specific needs.

    What to Consider
    Talk to your cardiologist about recovery from the surgery. Long-term considerations include cell phone usage—it’s recommended that you place your cell phone no closer than six inches to the ICD. You should also stand at least two feet away from power generators. Additionally, ICD patients are advised to cease driving for six months following the surgery, as the electric signals can sometimes cause fainting.

    If you have any other questions about how an ICD can benefit you, schedule an appointment with the cardiologists of Cardiac Solutions. Our Glendale, Peoria & Avondale clinic offer regularly scheduled checkups of your ICD device. Give us a call at (623) 876-8816 to learn more.

  • Guide to Fiber in Food

    Muesli with fresh Fruits

    by Dr. Jeffrey Greenberg of Cardiac Solutions

    Below is a guide to the amount of fiber in many types of food. This is a general guide. Remember that your daily goal is at least 40 grams of fiber per day.  For processed foods such as bread or cereal look at labels for the amount of fiber per serving. Increase your fiber intake slowly. It is best to get your daily fiber through foods versus powders. Try to avoid foods that have less than 2 grams of fiber per serving. Try to eat morning cereals that have at least 5 grams of fiber per serving (look at labels), if not more. Avoid foods with large amounts of added sugar.

    Simply click on each of the pictures below for a look at the fiber amounts in each ingredient.

    Fruits

  • What You Need to Know About Tachycardia

    cardiogram

    If your cardiologist diagnoses you with tachycardia, it means that you have a rapid heart rate. Tachycardia refers to a heart rate above 100 beats per minute; the normal heart rate ranges from 50 to 100 beats per minute. Although tachycardia does not always lead to other health complications, your heart doctor will likely explain that it can increase the risk of sudden cardiac arrest and stroke.

    Tachycardia Types

    There are a few different types of tachycardia; ask your cardiologist which type you have. Abnormalities in the electrical impulses around the heart can cause paroxysmal atrial tachycardia (PAT) and paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT). Ventricular tachycardia (VT) affects the lower heart chambers, and may be caused by certain medications or heart disease. If your cardiologist diagnoses you with ventricular fibrillation (VF), you will likely require immediate medical attention to prevent damage to the brain.

    Risk Factors

    Certain risk factors may increase the chances of developing tachycardia, including the consumption of excessive amounts of caffeine or alcohol. Smoking also contributes to the risk of tachycardia, along with anxiety and fatigue. Talk to your cardiologist about lifestyle changes to reduce your risk.

    Typical Symptoms

    Along with a rapid heartbeat, the typical symptoms of tachycardia include dizziness and lightheadedness. Your heart doctor may ask if you feel nauseous, have fainted in the past, or have experienced chest pain. Shortness of breath and cold sweats might also accompany tachycardia.

    Treatment and Prevention Measures

    Tachycardia requires the attention of a heart doctor if you experience frequent or prolonged episodes of a rapid heartbeat. For mild cases, a doctor might perform a carotid sinus massage. Severe cases require medication or implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs). Long-term prevention measures typically include reducing caffeine and alcohol, getting adequate rest, and quitting cigarettes.

    If you experience frequent or prolonged tachycardia, see a heart health doctor right away. If you live in the Glendale or Peoria area, contact the cardiology experts at Cardiac Solutions to learn more about treatment options. Schedule an appointment by calling (623) 876-8816 or visit our website to learn more.

     

  • How to Keep Up with Your Medication for Heart Health

    If you have high blood pressure or another heart health condition, your heart doctor has likely prescribed medications. It’s important to take your medications every day at the same time to manage your condition effectively. If you’re concerned about side effects from your medications, share these concerns with your heart doctor and discuss trying a different drug or dosage.

    Watch this video for some helpful tips on remembering to take your medications every day at the same time. The heart health coaches recommend pairing the medication with an activity that you typically do every day. Ed, a patient, also offers a couple of helpful tips for staying on track with your schedule.

    Talk to a cardiologist about a proper medication schedule for your health condition. Contact the heart doctors of Cardiac Solutions in the Phoenix-area by calling (623) 876-8816.

  • Taking a Look at the Basics of Cardiomyopathy

    human heart

    If your cardiologist diagnoses you with cardiomyopathy, it means that you have a disease of the heart muscle in which the organ becomes enlarged and weakened. Occasionally, cardiomyopathy can also lead to scar tissue on the heart. Ask your cardiologist  which type of cardiomyopathy you have—the three types are restrictive, hypertrophic, and dilated.

    Possible Causes
    There are many possible causes of cardiomyopathy , and in some cases, your heart doctor may be unable to determine the specific cause of your condition. Cardiomyopathy may be caused by metabolic disorders, heart valve problems, viral infections, chemotherapy drugs, and genetic conditions. Long-term, excessive consumption of alcohol, long-term hypertension, or a chronic rapid heartbeat can also lead to cardiomyopathy.

    Signs and Symptoms
    Cardiomyopathy may not show any symptoms in its early stages. However, if you experience abnormal heart rhythms, shortness of breath, fatigue, or weakness, you should see a heart doctor for diagnostic tests. Symptoms can also include swelling of the abdomen and lower extremities, along with fainting, dizziness, and lightheadedness while exercising.

    Potential Complications
    Cardiomyopathy may not always result in additional health complications, particularly when it is managed by a cardiologist. However, the possible complications can include blood clots and heart valve problems, along with heart failure or cardiac arrest. These complications often arise when the heart cannot pump enough blood due to the weakened heart muscle, or because the heart valves cannot close properly.

    Treatment Options
    Your cardiologist will customize a treatment plan to suit your needs, depending on the type of cardiomyopathy you have. You might take medications like diuretics or beta blockers, or you might benefit from an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). If you have restrictive cardiomyopathy, your heart doctor will recommend a low-sodium diet.

    The experienced heart doctors of Cardiac Solutions will develop a cardiomyopathy treatment plan to suit your needs. If you live in the Glendale or Peoria area,schedule an appointment today by calling (623) 876-8816. You could also visit our website to learn more about our state-of-the-art clinic.

  • Strategies for Coping with Your Heart Health Issues

    Doctor

    After being diagnosed with heart health issues, your primary focus should be your physical wellbeing. However, it’s also important to nurture your emotional health. Depression is quite common after a heart attack or another major medical issue. Talk to your heart doctor about these strategies for caring for your emotional health.

    Understanding Signs of Depression
    Be mindful of the common signs of depression, including uneven sleeping patterns, and unintentional weight loss or gain. Some people lose interest in activities that they previously enjoyed, and others feel agitated or lethargic. Suicidal thoughts and concentration problems can also indicate depression. Your heart doctor may urge you to see a specialist if you’ve been experiencing these symptoms for at least two weeks.

    Working with a Counselor
    Ask your heart doctor for counselor recommendations.  Working with a mental health counselor can help you move past these negative emotions so that you can start enjoying life again. Your counselor can help you learn to separate logical thoughts from irrational ones in order to better regulate your mood. He or she may also teach you breathing techniques and other stress reduction methods.

    Reaching Out to Friends
    Patients with heart health issues who experience depression tend to isolate themselves. If you’re feeling down, get out of the house and enjoy a sunny day at the park with a friend, or schedule a lunch date with your partner at your favorite restaurant. Let others know what you are struggling with, and consider joining a support group. Your cardiologist may know of local support groups for heart attack survivors.

    Taking Medication
    If counseling is not enough to ease your distress, talk to a psychiatrist about taking antidepressants. Many people find that a combination of counseling and mood-stabilizing medication is effective at relieving depression. Remember to tell the psychiatrist about any other medications that your cardiologist has prescribed for you in order to avoid complications.

    If you’re struggling with depression after being diagnosed with a heart health issue, you’re not alone. Learn more about caring for your heart health with assistance from the caring, knowledgeable cardiologists of Cardiac Solutions. Get in touch with one of our expert cardiologists today by calling (623) 876-8816.

     

  • Cardiac Solutions Donates to the American Heart Association

    Dr. Joseph Caplan and Dr. Marc Kates w check

    Cardiac Solutions’ online community has grown by leaps and bounds over the past month and it’s all thanks to you! Throughout the month of February , our Facebook page grew by an astounding 103 likes.

     We decided to go above our initial “1 like = 1 dollar donation” and added a extra “0” to the amount – so we are donating $1003.00 to the American Heart Association

    Thank you once again to everyone who participated and shared the news of our Facebook fundraiser.